Top 10 Most Famous Bridges in The World

Published by Tripspoiler on

1. Golden Gate Bridge (USA)

The Golden Gate Bridge is not the largest bridge in the world, nor the most significant from the architectural point of view of rhenium, and even more so its historical significance is doubtful, but without a doubt, the Golden Gate Bridge is the most famous and most photographed bridge in the world. The Golden Gate is a suspension bridge spanning the Golden Gate, the strait between San Francisco and Marin County to the north. Thanks to architect Joseph B. Strauss, whose statue adorns the southern observation deck, it took just seven years to build and was completed in 1937.

The Golden Gate Bridge was the longest suspension bridge in the world at the time and is a major tourist attraction in San Francisco and California. Since its completion, span length has been surpassed by eight other bridges. The famous red-orange color of the bridge was specially chosen to make the bridge more visible in the dense fog that often envelops the bridge.

Golden Gate, USA
Golden Gate, USA

2. Ponte Vecchio (Italy)

Ponte Vecchio, literally “old bridge” – a medieval bridge over the Arno River in Florence. The only Florentine bridge that remained intact after the Second World War. The bridge is famous for the fact that benches were built around it, as was common in the Medici era.

Ponte Vecchio (Italy)
Ponte Vecchio (Italy)

3. Tower Bridge (UK)

It took eight years, five large contractors and the tireless work of 1,000 construction workers every day to build Tower Bridge, now one of the symbols of London. Two massive jetties were sunk into the riverbed to support construction, and over 11,000 tons of steel provided the base for the Tower and Promenade. This frame was clad in Cornish granite and Portland stone to protect the underlying steel and give the Bridge a more noble appearance.

Tower Bridge (UK)
Tower Bridge (UK)

4. Brooklyn Bridge (USA)

Completed in 1883, the Brooklyn Bridge connects Manhattan and Brooklyn and crosses the East River. At the time it was discovered, and for several years, it was the longest suspension bridge in the world. The Brooklyn Bridge is an iconic landmark and one of the symbols of New York. In 1964, the bridge was listed as a National Historic Site of the United States. The bridge has a wide footpath open to pedestrians and cyclists. This trail takes on a special significance during difficult times when conventional means of crossing the East River became unavailable, as happened during several power outages and most notably after the September 11, 2001 attacks.

Brooklyn Bridge (USA)
Brooklyn Bridge (USA)

5. Charles Bridge (Czech Republic)

In 1357, Charles IV commissioned Peter Parler (architect of St. Vitus Cathedral) to replace the 12th-century Judith-Khevti Bridge, which had been washed away by floods in 1342. The new bridge was completed in 1390 and named Charles Bridge.

Charles Bridge is decorated with 30 statues on the parapets on both sides. Most of them were stationed there between 1706 and 1714. The first cross was erected on the Charles Bridge in the 14th century. The statue of Brunsquick was erected there until 1503, but only the pedestal has survived. It can be seen in the National Museum, and there is a replica on the Charles Bridge. The oldest surviving statue is St. John of Nepomuk from 1683, the newest is St. Cyril and Methodius from 1928. Several statues have been damaged by floods over the centuries. Mostly they were placed elsewhere, with replicas installed on the bridge.

Charles Bridge is the most famous stone Gothic bridge in the world and crosses the Vltava River in Prague, Czech Republic. Today it is one of the most visited attractions in Prague with artists, street musicians and other actors performing on this bridge.

Charles Bridge (Czech Republic)
Charles Bridge (Czech Republic)

6. Yongji Bridge (China)

The Yongji Bridge (also known as the Wind and Rain Bridge) was built in 1916 and is located in Chengyang, Sanjiang Autonomous Prefecture of Dong people near Liuzhou, Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region of China. It is best known among the bridges in the Dong minority region in China. The bridge stretches across the Linxi River and is built of wood and stone without nails or rivets and is the largest of all wind and rain bridges in the world.

Yongji Bridge has two platforms (one at each end of the bridge), 3 berths, 3 bays, 5 pavilions, 19 verandas and three floors . The berths are made of stone, the upper structures are mostly wooden and the roof is tiled. The bridge has wooden handrails on both sides. The Yongji Bridge has a total length of 64.4 meters and its corridor is 3.4 meters wide. The net height above the river is about 10 meters. The Yongji Bridge is located in Chengyang and serves as a link between two densely populated villages.

Yongji Bridge, China
Yongji Bridge, China

7. Chapel Bridge (Switzerland)

The Chapel Bridge is a 204 meter (670 ft) long bridge that crosses the Reis River in Lucerne, Switzerland . It is the oldest wooden bridge in Europe and one of the main tourist attractions in Switzerland. The covered bridge was built in 1333 and its main purpose was to protect Lucerne from attacks. A series of 17th century paintings depicting events from the history of Lucerne is now on display inside the bridge. Most of the bridge and most of these paintings were destroyed in 1993 by fire, but it was quickly rebuilt.

Chapel Bridge, Switzerland
Chapel Bridge, Switzerland

8. Alcantara Bridge (Spain)

Crossing the Tagus River near the Spanish city of Alcantara, the Alcantara Bridge is a masterpiece of ancient Roman architecture. The bridge was built between 104 and 106 AD by order of the Roman emperor Trajan, who was awarded a triumphal arch in the center of the bridge and a small temple at one end. The Alcantara Bridge had an extremely favorable strategic position and, as a result, it was often tried to be destroyed. The Moors destroyed the smallest arch on one side in 1543, while the second arch on the other side was damaged by the Spanish in the 18th century to stop the Portuguese. But despite this, the bridge has been perfectly preserved to this day.

Alcantara Bridge, Spain
Alcantara Bridge, Spain

9. Harbor Bridge (Australia)

The Harbor Bridge or Sydney Bridge, also affectionately referred to by the locals as the “Clothes hanger” because of its distinctive shape, was opened on March 19, 1932 by Australian Prime Minister Jack Lang , after six years of construction. The bridge contains 6 million hand rivets. The surface area is equal to the area of ​​60 sports fields. The bridge has huge hinges to absorb the expansion caused by the hot Sydney sun. Sydney Bridge has one characteristic difference from most other bridges, it can be climbed by climbing with an excursion to the Southeast Pylon, from where there is a beautiful panoramic view of Sydney, and the opportunities for photographers are simply fantastic.

The Harbor Bridge is one of Australia’s most famous and photographed landmarks. It is the world’s largest (but not the longest) steel arch bridge with the top of the bridge 134 meters above Sydney Harbor.

Harbor Bridge (Australia)
Harbor Bridge (Australia)

10. Viaduct Millau (France)

With a height of 343 meters, the Millau Viaduct is known as the tallest bridge in the world. He is also known for his design, which was considered impossible before his creation, as well as one of the greatest achievements in engineering and architecture. Designed by Michel Virlogue and Norman Foster, the Mihaud Viaduct was built in about 3 years at a cost of 394 million euros.

Viaduct Millau, France
Viaduct Millau, France

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