Pearl of the Danube, Budapest - Hungary

Pearl of the Danube, Budapest – Hungary

Budapest
Budapest

Budapest as the Hungarian capital was established in the administrative concept of the word only in 1873, when three cities were united: Buda, Obuda and Pest. Their history goes back to ancient times, when in the 1st century BC a Celtic settlement appeared on the banks of the Danube, significantly expanded by the Romans, who ruled in these places until the 4th century.

Budapest 2
Budapest

If the face of the quarters of modern Buda was determined by the Middle Ages and later the Baroque style, then the style of old Pest – a city surrounded by a wall, lying on the left bank – is determined by the popular in the first half of the twentieth century: classicism and romance.

Budapest 3
Budapest

During our excursion, we will visit the quarter of the Buda Fortress, the main dominant of which is now the Matyasha Church, erected on a medieval foundation in 1896. Next to the temple are the walls of the Fisherman’s Bastion, named after the type of activity of the workers of the workshop, who were entrusted with the mission of protecting the part of the fortress wall located in this place.

Budapest 4
Budapest

Budapest, Hungary

From it, along the old burgher streets, we will walk to the Royal Palace, where the Hungarian National Gallery is now located, and we will go down to the most famous bridge in Budapest. The Chain Bridge was the first city bridge to connect large areas of Pest and Buda. (more…)

Széchenyi Chain Bridge, Budapest - Hungary

Széchenyi Chain Bridge, Budapest – Hungary

Szechenyi Chain Bridge Budapest Hungary
Szechenyi Chain Bridge Budapest Hungary

Széchenyi Chain Bridge (Budapest) Hungary – description, history, location, map. Exact address, phone number, website. Reviews of tourists and photos.

Szechenyi Chain Bridge Budapest Hungary 2
Szechenyi Chain Bridge Budapest Hungary

The Széchenyi Chain Bridge (the correct accent is on the first syllable), or otherwise the Budapest Bridge, connects the two banks of the Danube , on which the two old halves of the city are stretched: Buda and Pest. The bridge opened to traffic in 1849, and it was the first (apart from temporary) in the capital after the Hungarian revolution of 1848. At that time, the central span of the bridge, reaching 202 m, was one of the longest in the world.

Szechenyi Chain Bridge Budapest Hungary 3
Szechenyi Chain Bridge Budapest Hungary

The Széchenyi Chain Bridge begins in Buda on pl. A. Clarke, near the departure point of the funicular to the Buda Palace. The bridge ends (or vice versa) at pl. I. Széchenyi, not far from the Gresham Palace.

Szechenyi Chain Bridge Budapest Hungary 4
Szechenyi Chain Bridge Budapest Hungary

Istvan Széchenyi was a prominent politician in Hungary, and he greatly contributed to the construction of the bridge. At the time of its construction, this bridge was so huge, and its design was so original that it was considered a real miracle of engineering. In addition, the bridge also had a symbolic meaning: it personified the union of two cities into one. (more…)

Fisherman's Bastion, Budapest - Hungary

Fisherman’s Bastion, Budapest – Hungary

Fisherman's Bastion Budapest Hungary
Fisherman’s Bastion Budapest Hungary

The Fisherman’s Bastion in Budapest, Hungary) evokes two associations – fish and fortifications. Although in reality you will not find fish here, and the structure, consisting of galleries and towers, has never been used to protect against external threats. Minor inconsistencies do not affect the love of Hungarians and visitors to the Fisherman’s Bastion. First of all, the attraction is loved for its gorgeous views of the Danube and Pest, but not only for that. Let’s figure it out.

Fisherman's Bastion Budapest Hungary 1
Fisherman’s Bastion Budapest Hungary
 

The history of the Fisherman’s Bastion

The architectural structure on the Buda Hill appeared relatively recently and therefore is sometimes undeservedly awarded with the condescending epithet “remake”. Like many famous things in Budapest (Vaidahunyad Castle, metro M1), the Fisherman’s Bastion (Halaszbastya) began to be erected in honor of the 1000th anniversary of Hungary at the end of the 19th century.

They did not have time to finish the construction for the anniversary, but since 1905 the attraction has been pleasing to the eyes of local residents and visitors. Several hundred years before these events, a walled square was broken up on the site of the Fisherman’s Bastion. Here they traded mainly in fish, and the Budai fishermen, in return, pledged to defend a section of the fortress wall in the event of a military threat day and night.

Fisherman's Bastion Budapest Hungary 2
Fisherman’s Bastion Budapest Hungary

Over time, the walls decayed, and the fishermen stopped their trade here. And together with the reconstruction of the Royal Palace, it was decided to build the Fisherman’s Bastion in Budapest, Hungary. Thus, the building owes its name to fishermen, and although it is called a formidable bastion, it never had a defensive value. The direct purpose of the Fisherman’s Bastion is the architectural background for the Matthias Church.

The landmark has been successfully fulfilling this role for more than a century. Both the church and the bastion are spread over the Holy Trinity Square (Szentharomsag ter). They are united by one more fact, more precisely the person Frydesh Shulek. This Hungarian architect reconstructed the Matthias Church and also designed the Fisherman’s Bastion.

Fisherman's Bastion Budapest Hungary 3
Fisherman’s Bastion Budapest Hungary

The latter is a 140-meter gallery eight meters wide, which, as it were, hugs the temple. The bastion has seven conical hipped towers, symbolizing the tribes that formed the Hungarian state many centuries ago. During the Second World War, the building of the Fisherman’s Bastion was seriously damaged by bombing. Its reconstruction after the end of hostilities was carried out by the son of the architect Frydes Shulek – Janos. (more…)